Element Energy

The Hydrogen Mobility Europe (H2ME) project, coordinated by Element Energy, demonstrates the need to be more ambitious about hydrogen mobility

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As the European Union and member states discuss reducing CO2 emissions from cars and vans, today’s Hydrogen Mobility Roundtable highlighted that local authorities, large industrial companies, and global vehicle OEMs are prepared to deploy zero emission mobility as an economically attractive solution requiring no compromise to operational requirements.

Hosted by Hydrogen Mobility Europe (H2ME) in partnership with the European Commission’s Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU) and Hydrogen Europe, the roundtable event comes the day after the European Parliament voted on setting tougher carbon dioxide emissions limits for cars and vans, in line with the policy aim of driving the adoption of low and zero emission vehicles. As part of the legislation, the EC will treat both hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) as zero emission vehicles.

The roundtable highlights that today’s technological advancements can support Europe to become an ambitious leader in zero emission mobility, underlining the inherent potential of hydrogen to deliver global emission reductions whilst meeting our future energy needs. The H2ME project is playing a critical role in creating the world’s largest network of hydrogen refuelling stations (HRS). 49 stations will be funded under the H2ME project, of which 15 are already in operation .

At the event, representatives from the initiative met with local municipalities and regional government representatives from across Europe to discuss real-world experiences, best practice and proven business models for the increased roll-out of FCEV vehicles and cross-border hydrogen refuelling infrastructure. Under the H2ME project 360 vehicles have already been delivered to end users and have been driven for close to 2 million kilometres. Attractive ownership models are developing in use cases such as taxis, captive fleets, and in cities with strict environmental targets.

Interest in FCEVs is increasing across Europe, with national governments in Norway, the Netherlands, the UK, France and Germany, amongst others, all supporting greater adoption. However, municipalities are waiting for greater direction from EU legislation to provide them with clear guidelines before rolling-out hydrogen fuelling stations and fuel cell fleets.

See the full H2ME press release for further information.

For more information about this project please contact Lisa Ruf

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